Our Redmine install died, We all cried!

We have been using redmine for quite a long time and a few months ago attempted to upgrade from 1.3 to 2.something. Unfortunately I (quite typically) borked the installation and since then its been hobbling along after my attempts to fix it left it crippled.

Yesterday it finally gave up the fight and my attempts to resurrect the installation were futile. After a quick funeral (the eulogy was very touching), and wake in a nearby emporium of alcoholic beverages to commiserate our loss, I set about trying to figure out what to do next.
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Quick and easy setup of and connection to NRPE on Ubuntu

About NRPE

NRPE (Nagios Remote Plugin Executor) is a useful tool that allows you to execute scripts on remote servers and return the output for ingestion by some form of monitoring software.

Setup

We currently have our own instance of Icinga running to monitor our servers and have recently started to offer access to it for our clients.

The majority of our servers (and our clients servers if we set them up) use one variant or another of Ubuntu. This means we can very quickly get our servers connected to a Nagios/Icinga instance.

First things first we need to install the nrpe server and all the associated plugins

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Debug PHP CLI on Remote Server with Xdebug and PHPStorm

This was a head scratcher when I ran into this yesterday and I thought I would share my solution to the following scenario:

I need to debug PHP Command Line script, located on Remote LAMP Virtual WebServer running in Virtual Box with a Shared Folder, using local PHPStorm 5.0.

The solution:

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Compiling Apache 2.4 on Ubuntu 12.04

I’ve decided that I need to up my game when it comes to webservers. However I’m not yet ready to switch to Nginx or one of the other webservers out in the wild as I need something up and running rapidly.

Granted the numbers are definitely against Apache in a lot of benchmarks but historically I’ve always had a good experience and the entry level makes it much more appropriate for me to stick with it.

However Apache 2.2 is rather long in the tooth, thankfully 2.4 has been out for a while now. The problem I have is that I tend to favour Ubuntu as a platform and there is no sign of a 2.4 version appearing on the horizon anytime soon as they are waiting for it to be implemented upsteam in Debian before including it in Ubuntu.

Now there are PPAs available out there but im not overly happy using them (especially on production environments) So the only option is to compile.
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Compiling PHP 5.4 on Ubuntu 12.04

So recently I’ve been working with PHP 5.4 a LOT. Unfortunately Ubuntu (my main dev environment) is behind the times. So I’m resorting to compiling PHP manually.

Not a daunting as it may first appear. The really tricky part is working out your dependencies and configure script.

Hence the reason for this post as a reminder for myself and others that may want to do a quick compile. (I would recommend that if your compiling for a production/live environment that you make sure you understand what it is your compiling though before just using what’s here)

So where to start. Dependencies first I think
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Rsync and custom SSH commands

Rsync is a great tool but can be a pain if you have to jump through hoops to connect via ssh such as connecting via a different port.

A simple solution is to use the -e flag (also knows as –rsh=COMMAND). This flag allows you manually define the ssh command to use when connecting

Will allow me to connect to a server with SSH listening on port 2020

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Nexus7

Nice New Nexus7

This morning I woke up to an email telling me that my Nexus7 that I had ordered 3 weeks ago was… “out for delivery”.

I couldn’t contain my excitement. I sat patiently waiting by my door. Finally 11 o’clock rolls around and there is a knock. I’m handed a brown parcel and hand over the obligatory signature. I close the door behind me and carefully place the box on the desk. I contemplate teasing myself and seeing how long I can hold out before opening it.
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Registering custom view helpers in ZF2

If you want to register custom view helpers with a module you can do so by using the service location built into the Skeleton Application and creating a module config that looks something like.

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Bootstrapping ZF2 Forms

So…

With the release of beta 5 for Zend Framework 2 I thought it time for me to tidy up and fix a few modules I created back at beta 3.

Now I’m a big fan of Twitter Bootstrap CSS framework as I’m sure a lot of other people are as well.¬†Seeing that the Zend Skeleton Application comes with bootstrap already included it was easy enough to set up my forms using the old ZF Forms found in ZF1.

However a brand spanking new Forms component has been rolled out with ZF2. The long and the short of this new component meant that I had the opportunity to hand roll a new way of making my forms work with Twitter Bootstrap.

So, a little tinkering, a quick pull request to ZF2 to allow the definition of arbitrary options and I came up with some useful View Helpers that can be dropped into a project and used.

You can find them at https://github.com/zucchi/Zucchi.

So how to use them. Lets start by creating a new form (we’ll keep it simple for now)
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Loaded Testing

I recently had to do some load testing for a site recently that would allow me to test in excess of 100k requests in a 60 second period…

JMeter

So I decided to do some testing using JMeter as it seemed like a suitable tool for doing what I needed and I had used it for some simpler testing in the past.

After a little fumbling around I managed to get a test plan designed that would simulate 10k users actually navigating the site and adding to a cart etc, with a number of various interactions. It wasnt perfect but it would correctly simulate over 100k requests.

So feeling quite pleased with myself I started the test from my laptop. Now I’m not a big gamer, I’m known to play a little World or Warcraft from time to time but that’s about it. So when it comes to computing power i tend to opt for battery life over sheer grunt.

Suffice to say, my laptop fell flat on its face, and if it hadn’t it turns out that the connection I was using just wasn’t up to the task of handling that much traffic adequately.

So plan B…

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