Tag Archives: ubuntu

Glorious Gluster – How to setup GlusterFS on Rackspace Cloud and Ubuntu 12.10

A few of our projects recently called for a distributed file-system that provided high availability and redundancy. After a tip off from a fellow techie and a quick browse around the net it appeared that a solution called GlusterFS appeared to tick all the boxes for what we were wanting.

However setting it up turned out not to be as trivial as I had originally anticipated. I’m going to try and put down the process we have evolved for setting it up on Ubuntu in the cloud

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Our Redmine install died, We all cried!

We have been using redmine for quite a long time and a few months ago attempted to upgrade from 1.3 to 2.something. Unfortunately I (quite typically) borked the installation and since then its been hobbling along after my attempts to fix it left it crippled.

Yesterday it finally gave up the fight and my attempts to resurrect the installation were futile. After a quick funeral (the eulogy was very touching), and wake in a nearby emporium of alcoholic beverages to commiserate our loss, I set about trying to figure out what to do next.
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Quick and easy setup of and connection to NRPE on Ubuntu

About NRPE

NRPE (Nagios Remote Plugin Executor) is a useful tool that allows you to execute scripts on remote servers and return the output for ingestion by some form of monitoring software.

Setup

We currently have our own instance of Icinga running to monitor our servers and have recently started to offer access to it for our clients.

The majority of our servers (and our clients servers if we set them up) use one variant or another of Ubuntu. This means we can very quickly get our servers connected to a Nagios/Icinga instance.

First things first we need to install the nrpe server and all the associated plugins

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Compiling Apache 2.4 on Ubuntu 12.04

I’ve decided that I need to up my game when it comes to webservers. However I’m not yet ready to switch to Nginx or one of the other webservers out in the wild as I need something up and running rapidly.

Granted the numbers are definitely against Apache in a lot of benchmarks but historically I’ve always had a good experience and the entry level makes it much more appropriate for me to stick with it.

However Apache 2.2 is rather long in the tooth, thankfully 2.4 has been out for a while now. The problem I have is that I tend to favour Ubuntu as a platform and there is no sign of a 2.4 version appearing on the horizon anytime soon as they are waiting for it to be implemented upsteam in Debian before including it in Ubuntu.

Now there are PPAs available out there but im not overly happy using them (especially on production environments) So the only option is to compile.
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Compiling PHP 5.4 on Ubuntu 12.04

So recently I’ve been working with PHP 5.4 a LOT. Unfortunately Ubuntu (my main dev environment) is behind the times. So I’m resorting to compiling PHP manually.

Not a daunting as it may first appear. The really tricky part is working out your dependencies and configure script.

Hence the reason for this post as a reminder for myself and others that may want to do a quick compile. (I would recommend that if your compiling for a production/live environment that you make sure you understand what it is your compiling though before just using what’s here)

So where to start. Dependencies first I think
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Loaded Testing

I recently had to do some load testing for a site recently that would allow me to test in excess of 100k requests in a 60 second period…

JMeter

So I decided to do some testing using JMeter as it seemed like a suitable tool for doing what I needed and I had used it for some simpler testing in the past.

After a little fumbling around I managed to get a test plan designed that would simulate 10k users actually navigating the site and adding to a cart etc, with a number of various interactions. It wasnt perfect but it would correctly simulate over 100k requests.

So feeling quite pleased with myself I started the test from my laptop. Now I’m not a big gamer, I’m known to play a little World or Warcraft from time to time but that’s about it. So when it comes to computing power i tend to opt for battery life over sheer grunt.

Suffice to say, my laptop fell flat on its face, and if it hadn’t it turns out that the connection I was using just wasn’t up to the task of handling that much traffic adequately.

So plan B…

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